Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Essay on Religion in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Religion in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte In Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte intertwines various religious ideas in her mid-nineteenth century English setting. Throughout the novel, Jane Eyre blends various religious insights which she has learned from different sources. While Jane was young, she had only a Biblical textbook outlook on life combined with the miserable emotional conditions of her surroundings. This in turn led to Jane being quite mean with Mrs. Reed. When Jane eventually goes off to Lowood and meets Helen Burns, she learns of her religious philosophy far more than the words would mean. Over the course of many years Jane then applies the basis of Helens religious philosophy and adjusts it for herself in relation to the†¦show more content†¦Helen Burns is probably the turning point of life for Jane, although we dont see it happening immediately. When Jane explains to Helen what she feels about being good she says, you are good to those who are good to you. It is all I ever desire to be. If people were alway s kind and obedient to those who are cruel and unjust, the wicked people would have it all their own way. Helen tells the little untaught girl, about life: It is not violence that best overcomes hate - nor vengeance that most certainly heals injury, and Love your enemies; bless them that curse you; do good to them that hate you and despitefully use you. Jane is incredibly confused by this statement; she cannot understand how she could ever love someone she hates so dearly, as in this case Mrs. Reed and her son, John. So Jane quickly responds with, Then I should love Mrs. Reed, which I cannot do: I should bless her son John, which is impossible. Although Jane does not yet comprehend Helen Burns words at this time, she will eventually learn the basis of what Helen is saying later in adult life; as shown when Jane returns of to Gateshead to Mrs. Reed?s deathbed showing forgiveness and compassion. ThenShow MoreRelatedJane Eyre Feminist Analysis1066 Words   |  5 Pagesintuition. Jane Eyre, a semi-autobiography by Charlotte Brontà «, is an exemplary novel where an untraditional heroine defies societal normality. The female protagonist Jane Eyre exhibits a self-created drive for personal success and a perpetual ambition to learn, characteristics customary of men. After the publication of Jane Eyre, many critics has viewed it through the feminist literary lenses, claiming it to contain biblical feminism. In the literary analysis â€Å"Charlotte Brontà «Ã¢â‚¬â„¢s Religion: Faith, FeminismRead MoreReligious Foreshadowing in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Essay832 Words   |  4 PagesForeshadowing in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Charlotte Brontà « uses several different symbols to foretell events that occur in Jane Eyre. For example, Brontà « uses birds to represent freedom, for which Jane longs and finally finds by the end of the novel. Fire is another symbol used by Brontà «: When Bertha sets Rochesters bed on fire, The image of fire might symbolize signifying first sinfulness, then rebirth (Vaughon). The symbolism most fascinating, however, is the way in which Brontà « uses religionRead More A Comparison of God and Religion in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea907 Words   |  4 PagesGod and Religion in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea      Ã‚   Jane Eyre, from Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre, and Antoinette Mason, from Jean Rhys Wide Sargasso Sea, both depict very different creeds. While Bronte created Jane with a Christian background, Rhys has birthed Antoinette into a more primitive, confused faith. Analyzing each writers description of the red room will reveal the religious nature of their characters. In both texts, the rooms are symbolic of church. As Jane is sent toRead More Biblical Allusions in Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre Essay1007 Words   |  5 PagesBiblical Allusions in Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre One Sunday evening, shortly after Jane arrives at Lowood School, she is forced to recite the sixth chapter of St. Matthew as part of the daily lesson (70; ch. 7). This chapter in Matthew states, Therefore take no thought, saying, What shall we eat? or, What shall we drink or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed? / (For after all these things do the Gentiles seek:) for your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things. / ButRead MoreEquality Within Charlotte Bronte s Jane Eyre1673 Words   |  7 Pagesideology of equality between men and women in society. Charlotte Bronte s novel Jane Eyre embraces many views in opposition to the Victorian gender limitations. Ultimately, the reader can see the author develops a variety of characters who not only represent but also challenge the established gender norms existing in the 1800s. Feminists like Charlotte Bronte, fight for equality emotionally, mentally, financially, and physically. When Charlotte was 5 her mother passed away, and therefore the lossRead MoreEssay Role of Faith in Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre708 Words   |  3 PagesThe Role of Faith in Jane Eyre      Ã‚  Ã‚   In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontes inspirational novel, religion is embraced through a series of spiritual explorations. Bronte portrays Janes character and zest for religion by revealing Janes transitions from Gateshead to Lowood, Lowood to Thornfield, and Thornfield to Moor House. Each location plays a significant role in the development of Janes perspective on religion. Jane struggles to acquire true faith in God, which will help her overcome theRead MoreExplore How Bronte Has Created an Anti-Christian Theme in Jane Eyre1677 Words   |  7 PagesSupernaturality, love, as well as hypocrisy as a sub unit of religion,are dominant themes combined in the retrospective novel Jane Eyre. The novel depicts characters, such as Mr Brocklehurst and St.John Rivers that are challenges to the ideal christian way and faith throughout the novel. The eccentric romantic gothic genre and the surrounding supernatural presence lurks around crowds of chapters. The contrastive saint Helen Burns used as a reverence to the good aspect and purity of christianityRead More Religion Through Spiritual Explorations in Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre1564 Words   |  7 PagesReligion Through Spiritual Explorations in Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre In Jane Eyre, religion is embraced through a series of spiritual explorations. Bronte portrays Janes character and zest for religion by revealing Janes transitions from Gateshead to Lowood, Lowood to Thornfield, and Thornfield to Moor House. Jane ultimately rejects everyone of these organized styles of worship. However, that does not mean that she rejects all their beliefs. She is forever changed by each experienceRead MoreHow Charlotte Bronte Creates Sympathy for Jane in the First Two Chapters of the Novel1423 Words   |  6 PagesHow Charlotte Bronte Creates Sympathy for Jane in the First Two Chapters of the Novel Charlotte Brontes novel Jane Eyre (1848) is a story is about a ten year old orphan girl called Jane Eyre. Her circumstances are as follows; when both of her parents died within a year of her birth, leaving her into the care of her Aunt, Mrs Reed. Mrs Reed is a widow of Janes uncle, who broke her promise to late husband by mistreating Jane cruelly. Then Jane is also bullied by here threeRead MoreEssay about Jane Eyre: The Effect of a Patriarchal Society 1721 Words   |  7 PagesCharlotte Brontà « composed her novel Jane Eyre during the Victorian era; a period of history where Patriarchy set the expectations of men and women. The effect of this social system resulted in women suffering discrimination simply because of their gender. Sigmund Freud, in his essay entitled, â€Å"The Relation of the Poet to Day-Dreaming,† articulated that women were only capable of having erotic wishes dominate their â€Å"phantasies,† and even their ambitious â€Å"phantasies† were rooted in erotic wishes (177)

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

My Life After High School - 1896 Words

â€Å"What do you want to do with your life after high school† is a frequent question that I am asked from family, faculty, and friends. Deciding what I want to do after high school was surprisingly quite easy for me, considering the fact that I have known what I wanted to do since freshman year. To find out more information about becoming an anesthesiologist, I conducted a research project on everything I will need to complete to get on the right track to seizing a job in this exciting medical field. The first phase of research included learning more about what being an anesthesiologist is, and the different things that came along with the job. I learned more about what their tasks are, what the salary of an anesthesiologist is, and miscellaneous things such as work hours and job placement. The next phase involved conducting an interview or job shadow with someone who has a career in the field. I conducted an interview with Dr.Barrett at Clarion Hospital. This interview provi ded me with insight on what I need to do to successfully obtain a career as an anesthesiologist. The last research phase was education. I researched three different undergraduate universities and one medical school which were the University of Pittsburgh, Duquesne University, Grove City College, and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. After all of this research I have concluded that this career is the right career for me. Although the career choice of an anesthesiologist will involve a longShow MoreRelatedMy Life After High School974 Words   |  4 Pagesduring the finales months of my senior year in high school, I began to start thinking about my life after high school. I had no idea of what I wanted to be in life. I knew I had liked arguing with people and standing up for what I believe. Then one day, I was watching one of my favorite movies â€Å"Legally Blonde†. A brief summary of the movie is that it is about a â€Å"dumb blonde’ girl who gets the opportunity of a lifetime to become a lawyer by attending Harvard Law School. In the beginning, she was lostRead MoreMy Life After High School981 Words   |  4 Pages After high school I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do for a career. After years of wandering I decided to join the military. I completed basic training and technical school in Texas. I was miles away from the comfort of family and friend back home in Maryland. This was the first time that I was truly on my own. After training was complete I was moved to Spokane, Washington. where I completed my term in Spokane and it was time to reenlist or get out the military. I was ready to have my life back soRead MoreMy Life After High School1138 Words   |  5 Pageswith my life is build and create. As a kid I was obsessed with building Legos but not with directions. Figuring out how to put it together without directions was a challenge but all that more satisfying. I also enjoyed tinkering with anything I could get my hands on, from toys to mechanisms. Throughout my life I have experienced many different events that have altered my thinking and aspirations for the future. Teaching myself and learning from others was the only way to get here today. My interestRead MoreMy Life After High School921 Words   |  4 Pagesin every adolescent s life in which reality begins to strike them. From an adults perspective this early stage is viewed simply as immaturity. Starting high school was a big change in my life and was a step in the direction of young adulthood.As individuals around me attempted to navigate down that similar path I gained a crisp taste of my identity. All of a sudden what was once a long distance future evolved into the near future as high school years passed and a test of my character was close atRead MoreMy Life After High School917 Words   |  4 PagesIt was my junior year in high school, when my life began to change. While I sat in my English class, with my head laid on top of the hard wooden cold desk, I thought to myself, what am I going to do. How was I supposed to provide for this child, but my mind kept think back to how was I going to let my mother know, that her youngest high school daughter was about to become a teen parent. I was scared. I was scared for my future. As the days became months, my belly continued to grow more and more.Read MoreGraduation Speech : My Life After High School907 Words   |  4 PagesWhen my high school graduation came around in the year of 2013 I was not sure what would be the next step in life after high school. I was undecided whether I would go to college. I didn t feel I was college material since I honestly did not do that well my last couple years of high school. I figured I would just learn to paint cars like my dad. I was working for my dad during that same summer after I graduated and I completely changed my mind on college. Going home in dust and grime everydayRead MoreMy Life After My Grade High School Year Essay2082 Words   |  9 PagesWhen helping others you always believe that you are doing the right thing. In this case, the right thing ended up with my parents’ jewelry gone and loss of what I thought was a friend. The start of my eleventh grade high school year in Seattle was not only the worst year of my life, but the most eye opening experiences of my life. How could someone play the role so well, and smile with a big, innocent grin to your family, but be so evil and empty inside? How could someone betray your trust when youRead MoreThe Low Income Schools Where The Kids Don t Get The Attention1626 Words   |  7 PagesWithin my community there are many low income schools where the kids don’t get the attention they need. My mom works at Laurel Elementary School where many kids have bad home situations or can barely speak English. Many of them are struggling in school because they have so many other things going on in their life. My mom has spent time one on one with some of her students tutoring them after school or over the summer and it really helps them. By spending more time with the students one on one outsideRead MoreMy Experience At High School848 Words   |  4 Pages High school is one of those times in life where most people have the best times of their lives, but for me I just wanted to get through it. Coming in freshman year I was done with the cattiness of the girls, the social pressures, and the monotony of school. Then I discovered the joy of ceramics! Ceramics was unlike any class I had taken in my entire life and had far reaching effects on my life. Ceramics kept me in high school by sparking my creativity and all of life’s possibilities. In high schoolRead MoreGrowing Up Is A Hard Thing For Me1554 Words   |  7 Pagesgrow up mentally. When I was in high school an event happen to me that completely changed my life from being a typical average high school kid who didn’t care about school, to a hard working dedicated student. Life can change in an instant, and change everything in an instant too. it happened to me once, and I am truly happy that it did because now I now that everything I have is a blessing, and I don’ t take anything for granted anymore. It all happened in high school. I remember graduating from Southern

Principle of Management Course My Experiences Essay Example For Students

Principle of Management Course: My Experiences Essay Principle of Management Course: My ExperiencesI believe that the Principles of Management course provided me withinvaluable information which will help in furthering both my professional aswell as personal life. I believe that learning is a process by which anindividual undergoes certain changes. Also, during the learning process, many ofthe beliefs which a person holds are challenged. I underwent various changesduring this course. This paper will explain those changes. Furthermore, I willdetail the concepts, ideas and situations which had the greatest impact on me. Before taking this course, my definition of the concept of managementwould have been strictly based on power relationships within an organization,how to use power to achieve your goals and how to manipulate people. Althoughthis definition might seem totalitarian, my background in Political Sciencesupported my initial misconceptions of management. I am a political sciencemajor and the questions most often asked in political science courses deal withpower within a structure and how this power is used, abused and expressed bythose in control. Therefore, I came into the Principles of Management coursewith the notion that I was going to be learning about power. This notion waschallenged as I learned that there are three different perspectives that areused to analyze an organization. There are three different perspectives used to view organizationalbehavior and processes: Strategic-Design, Political and Cultural. Initially, Iwas looking at the organization and the process of management from the politicalperspective. This perspective deals with the use of power and influencethroughout the organization. However, I also had to learn about the strategic-design perspective, which dealt with the differentiation, efficiency, strategy,coordination and integration of various tasks within the organization. I alsohad to learn about the cultural perspective which focused on the way in whichpeople assigned meanings to their respective work experiences. I was beginningto understand that management and the organization are not just an arena forpower relations. Instead, a variety of factors compose management. Managementdeals with the tasks, structure, culture and decision-making processes within anorganization. In order to be an effective manager one has to study and analyzet h e organization using all the perspectives. This was the first phase of my learning: I was beginning to understandthat the perspective from which I had been viewing the organization wasinsufficient because I was missing other important aspects of the organization. Therefore, I needed to use a multi-perspective lens to analyze the organization. I also learned about the roles that are present within an organization. These roles are: director, producer, facilitator, mentor, coordinator, innovatorand broker. Each of these roles has a distinct function within the context ofthe organization. These roles can complement and supplement each other. After doing the in-class exercise, I discovered that I fell in QuinnsRational Goal quadrant and was oriented towards director and producer roles. Adirector is expected to clarify expectations through processes, such as planningand goal setting. Directors define roles and tasks, generate rules andpolicies and give instructions.After studying many of my everyday activities,I noticed that I was inclined to give orders and that I was highly competitiveand goal oriented. I was also oriented towards the producer role. A produceris supposed to accept responsibly, complete assignments and maintain highpersonal productivity. By identifying the roles towards which I was inclined, it made it easierto track and remedy my negative tendencies. For instance, the my most negativetendency emanating from the director/producer role is that fact that I can beinsensitive to an individuals needs in the face of accomplishing my goals. After a process of self-examination I identified my problems and negativetendencies. At times, I possess an almost fanatical desire to achieve my goals. Product Analysis Clinique 3 Step System EssayI found the motivation and ethics cases to be the most interesting. Themotivation case was interesting because it proved that everyone is motivated bya different reason. There can be no textbook approach on how to motivatepeople. Instead, a manager has to sit down and communicate with the person andfind out what is behind the motivational problem. In this particular case, allof the people that had low sales figures had a unique reason and motive behindtheir problems. The ethics case was interesting because there was no clearanswer on what should be done to remedy the situation. This case was difficultbecauseone had to balance the interests of the company with the ethical issues andconsequences. It is very difficult to come to a resolution when the needs ofthe company conflict with what is ethical. I believe that the discussion of the future was an integral part of thePrinciples of Management class. In the beginning we started discussing the pastmodels of organizational structure. We talked about Max Webers Bureaucraticmodel. This model was once an efficient and orderly way of structuring theorganization since the organization was in a stable environment. However, todayit is obsolete. The current and future models will stress flexibility, freedomfrom rigidity, networkability and flatness. Organizations designed in thismanner will be able to exploit the quickly changing environment. The future environments will be characterized by chaos, complexity andcontradiction. Increasingly, managers will have to deal with tumultuous workenvironments instead of the stable environments of the past. A metaphor used tocompare the past management environment and the future business environment is:The old environment was like sailing. The new environment is like a kayakrace. The calm, secure conditions of sailing best reflect the old business andmanagement environments. However, the new environment is best represented bythe chaos and instability of a kayak race. At any time your canoe can capsizeand leave you to drown, said CEO Michael Cooper of METCECH Incorporated. Thisis further emphasized by the increased competition present in the marketplace. The high levels of competition are making it so that only the companies whichare most in tune with their customers needs and are most efficient survive. In conclusion, after identifying and integrating the first and secondphases of learning, I was able to work towards transforming myself. Thetransformation process does not end when I hand this paper in or with the end ofthe course. Rather, the transformation process is a constant struggle betweenmyself and what I have learned. If I choose to apply the lessons which I havelearned, then I will win that struggle. However, if I ignore the lessons then Ilose the struggle.

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Zigler vs.Gardner free essay sample

The late 1960’s seemed to be the end of one decade and the beginning of a new one; the country was heading into a new direction of politics, still fighting a war in Vietnam, and realizing our education system needs some new rebuilding. In 1969, a very famous singer Frank Sinatra released a song titled â€Å"My Way†, which was about the meaning of how a man’s existence leads him down a path of integrity before he expired and felt his life achieved the goals he was meant to have and behold. When I read the assignment Giving Credit where credit is Due, I have to identify two psychologists and briefly describe their main contributions to their field. One of the psychologists that I have to write about is Howard Garner (Gardner 2003) whose main contribution to the field of Intelligence research development and multiple intelligent theories. Gardner was interested in the social sciences and in 1972 was a founding member of Harvard Project Zero, when he joined project zero as a co-director in that same year. We will write a custom essay sample on Zigler vs.Gardner or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Gardner started a collaborated study on the artistic capacities in children, style sensitivity, and comprehension and understanding of metaphor (Gardner, 1980, 1982). The title of Gardner’s â€Å"My Way† made me think of Frank Sinatra in the sense that he and Gardner did things their way in their life time. Gardner wrote books that affected his identity in psychology. After reading â€Å"My Way†, Gardner felt his most important work and contribution to society was his 20 year extensive research in Neuropsychology studying the right hemisphere of the brain (Gardner 1975). While doing this research on this topic, Gardner was able to write some 60 empirical articles, even on cognitive neuroscience. (e. g. , Gardner, Brownell, Wapner amp; Michelow, 1983). Again, only in the 1960’s were government grants available to him to extend his research and prior to this there was no support or little help for his ‘empirical social sciences’ He had some struggles in his research. Gardner seemed to have some outside interest in education. In the 1980’s, he finally seemed to find a niche and interested educators response to the multiple intelligences theories and the second reason is the social, the concern of the United States in the fairish quality of pre-collegiate education. He also had some struggles and defeats when it came to writing peer reviewed articles and receiving negative feedback, even his grant applications were turned downed. It is quite interesting that he has compared himself to Frank Sinatra and everyone does things their way and even Gardner has received a very distinguished award in 1981, the MacArthur Prize Fellowship. In the conclusion of reading Gardner’s My Way, I really felt that Gardner was happy with his Way of doing research, a career as a psychologist and most important he certainly felt his love and passion for the values he believes in mainstream psychology. He clearly states in the end of his book, He would not go into Psychology again, he would chose Neuroscience, however he has no regrets and for me that clearly states that he will always have the passion for the intellect and the loyalty for the ages to come. The next Psychologist that I must identify and describe in brief is his main contributions is Edward Zigler, Once again, the 1960’s seem to be a decade of change in the United States in so far as education for a start, President Lyndon B. Johnson proposed an idea with the help from Dr. Robert Cooke, asked Edward Zigler to help on the War of Poverty, It seems that Edward Zigler was on his way to becoming a clinical psychologist with a specific field in child development, which is its own specialty, as time progresses, Dr. Zigler, also approaches a new developmental psychopathology area known as mental retardation. Special Education was not established in the 1960’s and new ideas and approaches were on the rise. The office of Children Development: (which is now called Children, Youth amp; Family) in which Zigler would become the official director during the Nixon presidency, (Zigler amp; Muenchow, 1992). In 1964, President Johnson started a committee with a blank sheet and created Project Head Start, members were from a variety of fields from mental health, social work, medicine and a child development, Project Rush Rush is the name Zigler and the insiders called it because it was a rush summer project with no statistics or plans on how to run the program. No means and measures to manipulate the information and how many children should be in the startup program. Project Head Start was an educational necessity for impoverished low income children before they attended elementary school. It was supposed to be in the summer with just 25,000 children and now in 1965, the enrollment exceeded to more half a million had already enrolled. Zigler that that poor children would have better chances of success if given more chances to better their lives, have access to healthy foods, good hygiene and oral care. It is interesting that a scientist such as Zigler goes to Washington, DC and ends up serving his country in a non-traditional way, the educational classes that Zigler sees in helping the parents will hopefully gain some insight in overcoming poverty stricken children. Zigler felt this was a worthy contribution and not an obligation; it was interesting to me that Zigler felt that the policymakers and academic psychologist really came from different worlds and sometimes could not see eye to eye. The office of Head Start is now a federally funded program that promotes school readiness of children to help and promote cognitive and social emotional development, it has now been reported that 18 million children that have walked through the doors of project Head Start and hopefully have excelled into the adults they should be. The resistance that Zigler seems to have had is his misunderstanding of how policymaking is processed and how they also did not know much about child development literature. There are some similarities between Zigler and Gardner such as; both went to Ivy League schools, very well educated, both ended up in education by different circumstances. Both became famous psychologists in their own way, both started their careers in the 1960’s, excelled in research that gave them an understanding of the minds. Zigler concentrated on mental etardation, whereas Gardner liked Neuroscience, one has the absence of a strong mind where as one likes the intricate work of the mind. The environment on the outside plays a role with children who are or can be under developed children whereas professional on the inside use their brains to play a role in the multiple intelligence theories. Their personal lives have crossed in the 1960’s at the peak of decade when new theories and ideas have pl ayed such an important part in our psychologist’s research and expertise.

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Road Warrior Essay Example

Road Warrior Essay Example Road Warrior Paper Road Warrior Paper Morons in Miami (and Other Cities and Countries, but Mostly Miami): Analysis of Dave Barry’s â€Å"Road Warrior† While driving on any road in America, and perhaps any other road on earth, motorists are not calm, not cool, not collected. They disobey the rules of the road by driving slowly in the left-hand lane; they disobey the rules of the road by trailing in extremely close vicinity behind the drivers ahead of them (so close that their front bumper occasionally collides with the alleged normal driver’s rear). Oblivious â€Å"MORONS† (76) would be a well-deserved name for these people according to Dave Barry and the â€Å"opinion-makers in the news media† (75). In the essay â€Å"Road Warrior,† Barry intertwines the use of a humorous and sarcastic tone as well as exaggeration to construct his argument that rage is an unnecessary, yet common, issue on the roads (in Miami) and beyond. Barry’s comical and satirical tone indicates the absurdity of the anger and hostility felt while traveling the highways. Beginning with a completely bizarre statement, Dave Barry writes: â€Å"If you do much driving on our nation’s highways, you’ve probably noticed that, more and more often, bullets are coming through your windshield† (75). Unless on an on an episode of Cops, Barry’s statement is truly fabricated. He explains that this effect of Road Rage is caused mainly by â€Å"the realization that many†¦motorists have the same brain structure as a cashew† (76). Seeming irrational, Barry reveals that even the National Institute of Traffic Safety believes that most motorists are MORONS. To continue his sardonic attitude, Dave Barry declares that these MORONS â€Å"drive in the left-hand†¦lane, even though they are going slower than everybody else† (76). In Barry’s mind, there is a possibility that â€Å"[these moronic drivers] belong to some kind of religious cult that believes the right lane is sacred and must never come in direct contact with tires,† or there is another possibility that at one point, while driving in the left lane, â€Å"their favorite song came on the radio;† since then â€Å"they’ve driven over there†¦in hopes that the radio will play that song again† (76). Barry’s rib-tickling thoughts of Road Rage transform into sidesplitting views of Shopping Cart Rage and Way Too Many Product Choices Rage. He clarifies that Shopping Cart Rage is generated by â€Å"the same people who always drive [slowly] in the left-hand lane† (77). These people accidentally place their cart in such a way that it â€Å"[blocks] the entire aisle† (77). Yet again, Barry utilizes his ysterical tone and jokes that â€Å"if [the government] really wants to keep illegal immigrants from entering the United States, [they] should employ Miami residents armed with shopping carts†¦to block the Mexican border† (77). Way Too Many Product Choices Rage adds to the congestion in supermarkets. Barry personally knows that this rage results from the fact that â€Å"every product†¦comes in an insane number of styles and sizes† (77). He highlights a recent situation in which he needed Tropicana Orange Juice: I had to decide whether I wanted Original, HomeStyle, Pulp Plus, Double Vitamin C, Grovestand, Calcium, or Old-Fashioned; I also had to decide whether I wanted the 16-ounce, 32-ounce, 64-ounce, 96-ounce, or six-pack size†¦I would have called Tropicana and complained, but I probably would have wound up experiencing Automated Phone Answering System Rage (â€Å"†¦For questions about Pulp Plus in the 32-ounce size, press 23. For questions about Pulp Plus in the 64-ounce size, press 24. For questions about†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ) (77). Here, Dave Barry demonstrates how too many choices can easily lead to anger. When all the heart desires is a container of Tropicana Orange Juice and thirty-five choices exist, all different styles and amounts, the heart becomes confused. In the end, confusion leads to frustration and Way Too Many Product Choices Rage. Barry hints that in the supermarket, Way Too Many Product Choices Rage is a serious problem: â€Å"If you do much† shopping in today’s supermarkets, â€Å"you’ve probably noticed that, more and more often,† hazardously thrown cereal boxes are flying through the air (75). These boxes are thrown by MORONS (the same people who perfectly position their shopping carts to block the entire aisle). Still remaining sarcastic and witty, Barry adds in a little exaggeration. He first labels himself as one of the few â€Å"Miami drivers who actually† uses the passing lane correctly (76). Barry writes mockingly that while wandering the highways he â€Å"[finds himself] constantly†¦trapped behind people drifting along on the interstate at the speed of diseased livestock, while at the same time [he is] being tailgated and occasionally bumped from behind by† unstable adolescents and their sound systems (76). Other drivers are too busy â€Å"[holding] family reunions, [barbequing] pigs, [and playing] volleyball† to notice their slow speed (76). His replica rage begins to surface when Barry complains that â€Å"nobody EVER signals or yields, and people are CONSTANTLY cutting [others] off† (77). Creating a unique hyperbole, his capitalization illustrates the rage felt by many drivers on the highway and in parking lots. While searching for a spot to park, drivers usually â€Å"see people get into their car, clearly ready to leave, so [they] stop [their] car and wait for [the person] to vacate the spot, and†¦nothing happens! (77) At this point, Dave Barry describes extreme Parking Lot Rage as the point when the waiting driver shrieks: â€Å"WHAT THE HELL ARE THEY DOING IN THERE!! COOKING DINNER † (77) The capital letters and repeated punctuation create a successful overemphasis of Parking Lot Rage. The so-called normal (not insane) response to a dilemma similar to t his would almost certainly consist of nothing but the question: What’s taking so long? Dave Barry effectively proves that road rage is avoidable, while still confirming its inevitability. While pulling into their driveways, motorists are calm, cool, collected. They become relieved to be off the dangerous roads where MORONS tailgate while idiots drive too slowly. Dave Barry pointed out in his essay that â€Å"there are many causes for rage in [the] modern world† (77). He makes one last witty and contradictory statement by explaining how all drivers need to â€Å"avoid unnecessary violence† in order to â€Å"keep [their] cool† (77). And what if they don’t listen? â€Å"[He] will kill [them]† (77).

Saturday, February 29, 2020

AntiWar Movement

The antiwar movement against Vietnam in the US from 1965-1971 was the most significant movement of its kind in the nation’s history. After evaluating different social theories such as: Functionalism, Conflict and Interactionism, I have decided to classify the Anti-War movement during the Vietnam War as a Conflict Theory. I feel the Anti-War Movement’s has characteristics of Neo-Marxism. Though the first American protests against U. S. intervention in Vietnam took place in 1963, the antiwar movement did not begin in diligence until two years later, when President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered massive U. S. military intervention and the sustained bombing of North Vietnam. Chambers) 2000. In the spring of 1965, â€Å"teach? ins† against the war were held on many college campuses. The Anti-War Movement was centered on America’s higher-education system, the students, playing leading roles. Teach-ins were extreme, massive public protests. By 1968 Protesters numbered close to seven million and over half of them were Caucasian college students. The teach-ins were primarily peaceful, but effective. They were successful in capturing the attention of the public as well as those in government. The motivation behind teach-ins were just that, with the hopes of further escalation in Vietnam to slow down or come to a halt. In April 1965, President Johnson gave a major Vietnam address at John Hopkins University, in response to the growing campus protest activity. This speech marked the political impact of campus demonstrations. (Electric Library) This is an example of Neo-Marxism. The protestors were getting a partial system change. They had the attention of the public, and most importantly the government. However, by 1967 a lot of anti-war activists began to think peaceful protests were not going to be enough to influence war policy, so they began using civil disobediences, strikes, public disruption, shouting at government speakers and guerilla theatre to get their message heard loud and clear. In March 1967, a national organization of draft resisters was formed. In April 1967, more than 300,000 people demonstrated against the war in New York. Six months later, 50,000 surrounded the Pentagon, sparking nearly 700 arrests. By this time it became typical for, senior Johnson administration officials to encounter demonstrators when speaking in public, forcing them to restrict their outside appearances. Many also had sons, daughters, or wives who opposed the war, fueling the sense of attack. Prominent participants in the antiwar movement included Dr. Benjamin Spock, Robert Lowell, Harry Belafonte, and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. With prominent leaders extending their support in the movement it gave the activist a great deal of motivation and validation. The social theory of Neo-Marxism was in full effect. By 1968, the Johnson administration realized the impact of widespread public opposition to the war and the troubling prospects in Vietnam, causing them to put a halt on the bombing of North Vietnam and to stabilize the ground war. This policy reversal was the major turning point. U. S. troop strength in Vietnam would climax at 543,000 (Chambers) 2000. The antiwar movement reached its peak under President Richard M. Nixon. In October 1969, more than 2 million people participated in Vietnam Moratorium protests across the country. The following month, over 500,000 demonstrated in Washington and 150,000 in San 4 Francisco. Militant protest, continued to spread, leading many Americans to wonder whether the war was worth a split society. And other forms of antiwar activity lingered on. The Nixon administration took a host of measures to dull the movement, mainly mobilizing supporters, smearing the movement, tracking it, withdrawing U. S. troops from Vietnam, instituting a draft lottery, and eventually ending draft calls. Once U. S. troops began coming home, the antiwar movement gradually declined between 1971 and 1975 (Chambers) 2000. The American movement against the Vietnam War was the most successful antiwar movement in U. S. history. The Neo-Marxism social theory is easily applied to the Anti-War Movement. The characteristics of the conflict were disorder, boycotts, intense conflict, commitment, and emotional involvement all of which resulted in system change. The activists involved in the Anti-War movement of this time were passionate and dedicated to seek change. They sought out peace and love for our Country and did not lose sight of their objective. They went to great lengths to achieve what seemed like the impossible. References http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O126-VietnamAntiwarMovement.html AntiWar Movement The antiwar movement against Vietnam in the US from 1965-1971 was the most significant movement of its kind in the nation’s history. After evaluating different social theories such as: Functionalism, Conflict and Interactionism, I have decided to classify the Anti-War movement during the Vietnam War as a Conflict Theory. I feel the Anti-War Movement’s has characteristics of Neo-Marxism. Though the first American protests against U. S. intervention in Vietnam took place in 1963, the antiwar movement did not begin in diligence until two years later, when President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered massive U. S. military intervention and the sustained bombing of North Vietnam. Chambers) 2000. In the spring of 1965, â€Å"teach? ins† against the war were held on many college campuses. The Anti-War Movement was centered on America’s higher-education system, the students, playing leading roles. Teach-ins were extreme, massive public protests. By 1968 Protesters numbered close to seven million and over half of them were Caucasian college students. The teach-ins were primarily peaceful, but effective. They were successful in capturing the attention of the public as well as those in government. The motivation behind teach-ins were just that, with the hopes of further escalation in Vietnam to slow down or come to a halt. In April 1965, President Johnson gave a major Vietnam address at John Hopkins University, in response to the growing campus protest activity. This speech marked the political impact of campus demonstrations. (Electric Library) This is an example of Neo-Marxism. The protestors were getting a partial system change. They had the attention of the public, and most importantly the government. However, by 1967 a lot of anti-war activists began to think peaceful protests were not going to be enough to influence war policy, so they began using civil disobediences, strikes, public disruption, shouting at government speakers and guerilla theatre to get their message heard loud and clear. In March 1967, a national organization of draft resisters was formed. In April 1967, more than 300,000 people demonstrated against the war in New York. Six months later, 50,000 surrounded the Pentagon, sparking nearly 700 arrests. By this time it became typical for, senior Johnson administration officials to encounter demonstrators when speaking in public, forcing them to restrict their outside appearances. Many also had sons, daughters, or wives who opposed the war, fueling the sense of attack. Prominent participants in the antiwar movement included Dr. Benjamin Spock, Robert Lowell, Harry Belafonte, and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. With prominent leaders extending their support in the movement it gave the activist a great deal of motivation and validation. The social theory of Neo-Marxism was in full effect. By 1968, the Johnson administration realized the impact of widespread public opposition to the war and the troubling prospects in Vietnam, causing them to put a halt on the bombing of North Vietnam and to stabilize the ground war. This policy reversal was the major turning point. U. S. troop strength in Vietnam would climax at 543,000 (Chambers) 2000. The antiwar movement reached its peak under President Richard M. Nixon. In October 1969, more than 2 million people participated in Vietnam Moratorium protests across the country. The following month, over 500,000 demonstrated in Washington and 150,000 in San 4 Francisco. Militant protest, continued to spread, leading many Americans to wonder whether the war was worth a split society. And other forms of antiwar activity lingered on. The Nixon administration took a host of measures to dull the movement, mainly mobilizing supporters, smearing the movement, tracking it, withdrawing U. S. troops from Vietnam, instituting a draft lottery, and eventually ending draft calls. Once U. S. troops began coming home, the antiwar movement gradually declined between 1971 and 1975 (Chambers) 2000. The American movement against the Vietnam War was the most successful antiwar movement in U. S. history. The Neo-Marxism social theory is easily applied to the Anti-War Movement. The characteristics of the conflict were disorder, boycotts, intense conflict, commitment, and emotional involvement all of which resulted in system change. The activists involved in the Anti-War movement of this time were passionate and dedicated to seek change. They sought out peace and love for our Country and did not lose sight of their objective. They went to great lengths to achieve what seemed like the impossible. References http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O126-VietnamAntiwarMovement.html

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Policy brief on Poverty and Development in Argentina Assignment

Policy brief on Poverty and Development in Argentina - Assignment Example This report declares that poor enrolment rate of the poor population in Argentina was further worsened by the recent economic recessions that occurred in the years 1995 and 1999. There are viable strategies that could be adopted by the Argentinean government to ensure that this problem is arrested once and for all. The government should ensure that there is extension of greater investments in educational facilities, for example, extending the â€Å"Plan Social Educativo† that is currently in place. In addition to that, the government should also grant cash grants to its poor populations to ensure that their children are kept in school especially at the secondary level as this will greatly offset some of the economic incentives arising from leaving school and also cope with the impacts associated with unemployment. This paper makes a conclusion that there is actually a lot that the government of Argentina could do to arrest poverty issues in the country. The establishment or the creation of a system that will entail cost recovery from public university students who at most times tend to come from poor families and the creation of a nationwide system comprising of scholarships for students coming from poor families will be a great step in poverty reduction. Indeed, hope is not lost for Argentina as a country and therefore the adoption of the above strategies will greatly make the country to become a great economic hub in the world.